Title

A Comparison of Self-Concept Between Competitive Video Game Players and Nonvideo Game Players

Author

David Gofman

Date of Award

5-25-2016

Document Type

Masters Project

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Graduate School of Professional Psychology

First Advisor

Steve Portenga

First Committee Member

Ted Fifield

Keywords

Self-concept, identity, well-being, self-worth, gaming, video games, esports, sport, psychology, performance

Abstract

This investigation utilized a descriptive, cross-sectional research design to investigate several components of self-concept of competitive video game players. 124 competitive video game players from 27 different countries completed a questionnaire battery consisting of the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (AIMS), the Contingencies of Athletic Self-Worth (CASW) scale, and the Questionnaire for Eudaimonic Well-Being (QEWB). The scores from this survey were then compared to scores of athletes and students from prior studies to better understand the similarities and differences between competitive video game players, and athletes and students, regarding these areas of self-concept. The results support the notion that competitive video game players identify with their domain with similar strength to how athletes identify with being an athlete. They have their self-worth contingent upon success in their domain similarly to students and academics, and have a similar strength of eudaimonic well-being when compared to undergraduate students.

Comments

Copyright is held by the author. Permanently suppressed.

Extent

33 pages

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