Date of Award

1-1-2015

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Child, Family and School Psychology

First Advisor

Cynthia Hazel

Second Advisor

Nicole Nicotera

Keywords

college student, disabilities, disability, higher education, self-advocacy, social support

Abstract

This study explored the connection between social support and self-advocacy in college students with disabilities. The College Students with Disabilities Campus Climate Survey (Lombardi, Gerdes, & Murray, 2011) was used to gather data from undergraduate students at a midsize western private university.

Social support was found to be a significant predictor of self-advocacy in college students with disabilities. Peer support, family support, and faculty teaching practices made up the construct of social support. Peer support and faculty teaching practices were found to be significant predictors of student self-advocacy. Family support was not found to be significant. The data was examined for group differences between genders, disability types, and disability status (high incidence disabilities versus low incidence disabilities). No significant group differences were found. These findings suggest helping students build social support will increase their level of self-advocacy, which in turn may increase academic success.

Provenance

Recieved from ProQuest

Rights holder

Julia I. Marcus Johnson

File size

86 p.

File format

application/pdf

Language

en

Discipline

Educational psychology, Higher education, Education

Share

COinS