Date of Award

1-1-2016

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Candance Upton

Second Advisor

Kateri McRae

Keywords

cognitive emotion regulation, difficulty, other, self, self-focused thought, success

Abstract

The present dissertation reports a set of three studies that sought to characterize the effects of self-focused cognition on emotion regulation, specifically, cognitive reappraisal. Across the three studies, I investigated the effects of self-distancing, disengagement of self-focused thought, and changing the content of self-focused thought on multiple measures of emotion regulation success and emotion regulation difficulty. Results broadly suggested that disengaging self-focused cognition provides distinct advantages for emotion regulation, which are independent of effects on emotional reactivity. Specifically, I observed that other-focused cognition resulted in equally successful, but less difficult emotion regulation, the ability to more quickly disengage from self-focused thought was associated with greater emotion regulation success, and a greater tendency towards engaging in self-focused thought was associated with increased emotion regulation difficulty. I discuss the possible mechanisms explaining these effects, their specific implications for the study of emotion regulation, as well as their broader implications for the study of self-regulation.

Provenance

Recieved from ProQuest

Rights holder

Ana Maria Draghici

File size

126 p.

File format

application/pdf

Language

en

Discipline

Experimental psychology, Cognitive psychology, Social psychology

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