Date of Award

1-1-2017

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Child, Family and School Psychology

First Advisor

Karen Riley, Ph.D.

Keywords

Child Behavior, Collaborative Problem Solving, Empathy, Parent-Child Relationship, Parent Training

Abstract

The intent of the Think:Kids Collaborative Problem Solving (CPS) Parent Group Therapy curriculum is to help parents recognize the underlying skill deficits contributing to their child's challenging behavior, identify pathways leading to the behavior, and make environmental changes to prevent problem behavior. This quasi-experimental study assessed the effects of implementing a 6-week, 12-hour Think:Kids CPS parent curriculum in a public school setting with an intervention group compared to a non-random waitlist group. Data was collected for both groups at pre-, post-and one-month follow-up on the following measures: the Parent Child Relationship Inventory (PCRI); the Parenting Stress Index, 4th edition, Short Form (PSI-SF); the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI); and the Think:Kids Parent Group Therapy Questionnaire. Data was collected weekly and at one-month follow-up on the Think:Kids - Change Over Time (TK-COT) and the Goal Attainment Scale (GAS). Seven parents participated in the intervention group and four parents participated in the waitlist comparison group. Attrition was low as all intervention group parents completed the class. Results on the PSI-SF did indicate statistically significant improvement in parent-child interactions for the intervention group compared to the waitlist group and in parent perception of their child's behavior for both groups, warranting further study of the Think:Kids Parent Group Therapy with larger sample sizes and a randomized control design. Results indicated the Think:Kids Change Over Time (TK:COT) shows promise as an outcome measure for measuring adherence to the CPS philosophy. Mixed results on the PCRI could indicate issues with its use in applied settings. Implications of these findings and further research directions of the Think:Kids CPS parent curriculum are discussed.

Copyright Statement / License for Reuse

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Provenance

Received from ProQuest

Rights holder

Tyra B. Vickers

File size

175 p.

File format

application/pdf

Language

en

Discipline

Social Psychology

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