Date of Award

1-1-2017

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Sarah Enos Watamura, Ph.D.

Keywords

Family Stress Model, Latino Immigrants, Low Income Children, Parenting Self-Efficacy

Abstract

The Family Stress Model (FSM) provides a framework for how economic pressure can impact family processes and outcomes, including parent's mental health, parenting, and child problem behaviors. Although the FSM has been widely replicated, samples disproportionately impacted by poverty including early childhood samples and in particular Latino families with young children, have been largely excluded from the FSM research. Therefore, among a sample of ethnically diverse Early Head Start children (N=148) and among a subsample of Latino children (n=100), the current study evaluated a modified FSM to understand the direct and indirect pathways among economic pressure, parental depression, parenting self-efficacy, the parent-child relationship, and child problem behaviors. Results showed that the modified FSM including parenting self-efficacy was successfully replicated within the full early childhood sample; however, specific hypothesized pathways were not replicated among Latinos. Further analyses illuminated how pathways identified in the full sample were replicated among more but not among less acculturated Latino parents. Implications for future FSM research with Latino families as well as for parent-focused interventions are discussed.

Copyright Statement / License for Reuse

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Provenance

Received from ProQuest

Rights holder

Eliana Hurwich-Reiss

File size

86 p.

File format

application/pdf

Language

en

Discipline

Psychology

Available for download on Saturday, September 21, 2019

Included in

Psychology Commons

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