Date of Award

1-1-2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

International and Intercultural Communication

First Advisor

Margaret Thompson

Abstract

This research explores the nature of Japanese American cultural identity through an examination of the historical contexts of WWII, internment, and the 3/11 disasters in Japan. Interview data was analyzed using both interpretive and critical paradigms. I then utilized the Communication Theory of Identity (CTI), the corresponding concept of identity gaps, and critical-cultural hybridity. It was found that Japanese Americans construct, enact, and relate to their identities in markedly different ways despite belonging to the same cultural group. In turn, I am proposing further revision to CTI's communal frame to exemplify the shared and contested elements of a collective. This research also suggests that the structural context of internment has impacted Japanese Americans even though they may not perceive much of an impact on their own identity conceptions. Moreover, this study argues that internment has profoundly shaped the lives of Japanese Americans, which future research can continue to explore.

Provenance

Recieved from ProQuest

Rights holder

Carrie Miller

File size

218 p.

File format

application/pdf

Language

en

Discipline

Communication, Asian American studies, Mass communication

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