Date of Award

1-1-2012

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Child, Family and School Psychology

First Advisor

Karen Riley

Keywords

Academic Achievement, Obesity, Physical Activity, Student Engagement

Abstract

Physical activity is important, and many adolescents are not meeting the recommendation that youth participate in at least 60 minutes of physical activity most days of the week (CDC, 2011). Physical inactivity among middle school students is on the rise and may be a contributing factor to a decline in academic performance. Prior research has focused primarily on bodily health; however, growing evidence supports the benefits of physical activity for academic achievement (Chomitz et al., 2009). This study examined the relationship between middle school students' perceptions of physical activity and student engagement they relate to academic achievement among 179 middle school students in one suburban middle school. Additionally, this study sought to investigate students' perceptions of physical activity as well as the context within which these perceptions take place, which may lead to more effective strategies to help improve academic achievement. Propositions from Bronfenbrenner's ecological theory were used to examine the different factors influencing the relationship between middle school students' perceptions of physical activity and student engagement as they relate to academic achievement.

This study is predominantly a correlational and regression design, which examines relationships and predictive ability of key variables. This research design will add depth to the study by investigating the social influences in schools regarding the relationship between physical activity, student engagement, and academic achievement

Provenance

Recieved from ProQuest

Rights holder

Jeremy D. Moretti

File size

143 p.

File format

application/pdf

Language

en

Discipline

Education, Health education

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