Date of Award

1-1-2012

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Howard J. Markman

Keywords

Couples, Gratitude, Positive Psychology, Romantic Relationship, Well-being

Abstract

The current study replicated and extended existing research on gratitude by examining the ways in which gratitude is related to both individual and relationship well-being. A total of 387 participants completed the pre assessment and were randomized into the study, with 251 participants completing the full study (i.e., pre, post, and follow-up assessments). Participants were randomly assigned to list relationship-focused gratitudes, amusing events, or general events that happened during their day for 14 days. The differential impact of the three interventions on both individual and relationship variables was investigated. The relationship-focused and general events conditions experienced decreased negative affect from the pre to post assessment compared to the amusement condition. There were no other group differences. Participants across conditions experienced increases in life satisfaction, gratitude, and relationship confidence, as well as decreases in negative interaction. There also appeared to be short-term decreases in positive affect and positive connection for participants in all conditions. Changes in gratitude were associated with increases in relationship well-being. Additionally, cross-sectional analyses indicated that gratitude was associated with both individual and relationship well-being. Possible explanations for the lack of group differences as well as implications for future research are discussed.

Provenance

Recieved from ProQuest

Rights holder

Erica Pearse Ragan

File size

122 p.

File format

application/pdf

Language

en

Discipline

Psychology, Clinical psychology

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