Date of Award

1-1-2010

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Anthropology

First Advisor

Lawrence B. Conyers

Keywords

Communities of Practice, Environmental Change, Footwear, Population migration, Prehistory, Southern High Plains

Abstract

Perishable artifacts, such as basketry, cordage, and sandals are rare cultural materials due to the environments in which they are preserved and their inherent non-durability. Where recovered, researchers have used them to study expressed identity and trace population movements over time and space. On this premise, previously un-described sandal assemblages from Trinchera Cave, Colorado and the Kenton Caves, Oklahoma/New Mexico were age dated, analyzed, and compared to other known sandal collections throughout North America, including Franktown Cave, Colorado. The study of the rare perishables from all three caves/rockshelters on the Southern High Plains have provided a unique opportunity for the acquisition of information regarding the technology used by and possible affiliations of prehistoric people in and immediately adjacent to this region. Specifically, the utilization of similar sandal styles at these sites at different times during the Archaic through Late Prehistoric periods suggests several population movements on the Southern High Plains.

Provenance

Recieved from ProQuest

Rights holder

Allison Rexroth

File size

449 p.

File format

application/pdf

Language

en

Discipline

Archaeology

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