Date of Award

1-1-2009

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Counseling Psychology

First Advisor

Jesse N. Valdez

Keywords

Discrimination, Mexican American, Self-Stigma, Stigma

Abstract

The stigma of mental health problems between Mexican Americans and White non-Hispanic European Americans was investigated and measured by attitudes toward seeking help and the amount of social distance desired from individuals with mental health problems. The stigma of mental health has been identified as a barrier to accessing mental health services among Mexican Americans and men in general. Men from both groups access mental health services at a significantly lower rate than women from both groups. This study contributed to research and practice by examining the possible differences in the level of stigma toward mental health problems between Mexican Americans and White non-Hispanic European Americans. This study also explored the relationship between Mexican Americans' acculturation level as well as selected demographic variables and the stigma of mental health problems. There were no significant ethnic or gender differences in the level of stigma toward mental health between the two groups. However, there was a significant gender difference within the White non-Hispanic European American group. Results also indicated that there was no significant relationship between Mexican Americans' acculturation level and the amount of stigma toward mental health. However, there was a significant positive correlation between Mexican Americans' age and the amount of social distance desired from individuals with mental health problems.

Provenance

Recieved from ProQuest

Rights holder

Jeff D. Wright

File size

125 p.

File format

application/pdf

Language

en

Discipline

Mental health, Clinical psychology, School counseling

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