Date of Award

1-1-2012

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Josef Korbel School of International Studies

First Advisor

Suisheng Zhao

Keywords

Chinese foreign policy, crisis management, global governance, intervention

Abstract

The 21st century began with two major features--global governance and China rising. An important aspect for investigating if China will turn into a responsible great power or the contrary is to see how China deals with pariah states which have been targets of international intervention. Yet China seems to fail the expectation by blocking proposals of interventions in the Security Council. The main task of this dissertation is to investigate why China holds negative attitude toward intervention via coercive means on so-called pariah states. This research project firstly investigates the realist assumption that China rejects to support intervention for immediate and apparent material interests. The second level of investigation is pillared by constructivism and focuses on the power of social pressure and China's relations with the target states. The third level is looking for the answers from inner perspectives, i.e. China's evaluation of the cases of intervention and how such evaluation is shaped by Chinese worldview and political culture. The two cases selected are North Korea and Myanmar. This dissertation provides evidences via detailed case studies and nullifies the conventional explanations. It further depicts the Chinese pattern of intervention and the specific style constructed on China's pursuit of relational security. The finding of this research should contribute to the theoretical and empirical studies of the evolution and diversity of global governance.

Provenance

Recieved from ProQuest

Rights holder

Chiung-Chiu Huang

File size

268 p.

File format

application/pdf

Language

en

Discipline

International relations, Asian studies

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