Title

Developing Autonomous Microgrids: A Theoretical Case Study

Author

Daniel Wright

Date of Award

6-3-2015

Document Type

Capstone Project

Disciplines

Environmental Policy & Mgmt

Degree Name

Master of Applied Science

Department

Environmental Policy & Mgmt

Advisor

Kathy Flanagan

Keywords

Microgrid; Renewable Energy; Energy Storage; Distributed Generation; Energy Infrastructure; Wind Power; Solar Power; Battery Storage; Grid

Abstract

Microgrids are autonomously operated, geographically clustered electricity generation and distribution systems that supply power in closed system settings; they are highly compatible with renewable energy sources and distributed generation technologies. Mocrogrids are currently a serially underutilized and underappreciated commodity in the energy infrastructure portfolio worldwide. To demonstrate feasibility under poor conditions (little renewable energy potential and high demand) this capstone project develops a theoretical case study in which a renewable microgrid is employed to power rural communities of southern Montgomery County, Arkansas. Utilizing commercially manufactured 1.5-megawatt wind turbines and a 1-megawatt solar panel generation system, 4-megawatts of lithium ion battery storage, and demand response technology, a microgrid is designed that supplies 235 households with reliable electricity supply.

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