•  
  •  
 

Abstract

Systemwide or multi-campus licenses provide many benefits such as favorable pricing, access to an expanded array of resources for all participants, and streamlined licensing. They also usually involve cost sharing among participating campuses. The licensing process can be labor-intensive and time-consuming. Successful collaboration among participants is essential in reaching consensus. In the past, the University of California (UC) libraries employed many cost models, and the California Digital Library (CDL) applied them for CDL-licensed subscriptions, both new licenses and renewals. After several years of discussion, the UC Libraries decided to implement an FTE-based model as the default cost share model, except in cases 1) in which a vendor quotes pricing for each campus; and 2) with fewer than all ten participants, or nine without UC San Francisco. Adjustments are made to co-investment shares to meet the principle that no campus should be asked to contribute more for a shared license than it would have to pay on its own. Additionally, CDL funds are occasionally used to support shared access to resources. The new default FTE-based model was implemented starting with the fiscal year 2018/2019, and is being phased in over a three-year period. To alleviate the impact of the FTE model implementation, CDL negotiated renewal fees for numerous resources and led a large-scale cancellation project for UC campuses. This article is a case study to inform libraries and consortia that might be interested in building shared collections and learning from UC’s experience in facilitating discussions, encouraging collaboration, and coming up with a cost share model that works for their system and creates shared value in the end.

Share

COinS