Date of Award

1-1-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

English

First Advisor

W. S. Howard

Second Advisor

Jonathan Sciarcon

Keywords

blackness, gender, poetic geography, race, religion, Shakespeare

Abstract

This project is a study of the development of early modern racial categories in Englandâ??focusing on religion and skin color as primary modes of demarcation interwoven with other prevalent categories of language, ancestry/blood, nationality, and genderâ??as illuminated in William Shakespeareâ??s The Merchant of Venice and Othello. Religion and skin color, then, are the primary modes of racializing individuals in early modern England and characters in Shakespeareâ??s works. This essay studies the context of racial difference as present in English and European rhetoric, art, theater, and exploration. Given this context, the paper explores the poetic geography of Venice as present in the economic ramifications of the term â??bondâ?? in both Merchant and Othello. It then investigates English imperial desires alongside fears of invasion and miscegenation. Alongside these topics, the project addresses â??ocular proofâ?? which serves as a cultural methodology for demonstrating racial hierarchies. Shakespeare questions this technique by illustrating the flaws of visual evidence.

Provenance

Recieved from ProQuest

Rights holder

Edward A Cooper

File size

77 p.

File format

application/pdf

Language

en

Discipline

Literature, History, Black studies

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