Date of Award

1-1-2009

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Child, Family and School Psychology

First Advisor

Gloria Miller

Keywords

ADHD, Learning Disabilities, Self-advocacy

Abstract

Self-advocacy is identified as a factor important to the success of college students with Learning Disabilities (LD) and/or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). However, educators do not yet know enough about the experience of self-advocacy in the post-secondary learning environment to effectively guide students in the development of this complex set of skills. This study was designed to describe the experience of college students with LD and/or ADHD as they advocate for themselves in the college or university environment and to compare the students' experiences as self-advocates to what educators believe to be true about self-advocacy based on the existing literature. The study employed a series of case studies conducted with phenomenological methodology. The data revealed that students experience self-advocacy as a means of building a working relationship with faculty, a means of declaring their character, a weapon to do battle when conflicts arise, and a means to assign the LD/ADHD a role within their learning experience. Data confirmed the importance of communication, assertiveness, knowledge of LD/ADHD, academic self-concept, self-efficacy and locus of control, and problem-solving skills. The above factors were assembled into a framework describing their functioning in concert to facilitate self-advocacy. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

Provenance

Recieved from ProQuest

Rights holder

Jennifer M. Cano-Smith

File size

198 p.

File format

application/pdf

Language

en

Discipline

Higher education

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