Date of Award

1-1-2014

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Curriculum and Instruction

First Advisor

P.Bruce Uhrmacner

Second Advisor

Nicole M. Russell

Keywords

African American, Black, early childhood, gifted, preschool

Abstract

"Knowledge is like a garden: if it is not cultivated, it cannot be harvested"

-African Proverb

Each day, African-American children are rarely given the opportunity to reach their full potential and flourish in American school systems. There continues to be a disparity in the number of African-Americans in the gifted population. When identified early, and with appropriate educational opportunities, young, culturally diverse gifted learners will be more likely to have long-term educational success. By utilizing an educational criticism methodology, this study discusses the importance of gifted education for African-American, early childhood students, by answering the question, how does The Hope Center engage in gifted education. This investigation reveals how one inner-city preschool program has planted seeds of Hope for an underrepresented group of learners. This is a reflection of how one small community is doing its part in cultivating our youngest gardens of learning.

Provenance

Recieved from ProQuest

Rights holder

Danielle Harris

File size

135 p.

File format

application/pdf

Language

en

Discipline

African American studies, Early childhood education, Gifted education

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