Date of Award

1-1-2018

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Child, Family and School Psychology

First Advisor

Gloria Miller, Ph.D.

Keywords

Academic self-efficacy, Adolescents, Parental involvement, Protective factors, Resilience, Special education

Abstract

The predictive value of three constructs was examined in this study in order to explain adolescent self-reported protective factors associated with resilience while moderating for the effects of sex and race. The three constructs included Academic Self-efficacy, Maternal Parental Involvement, and Special Education Identification Status. Participants included 54 adolescents in diverse public middle and high schools, ages 11 to 18. Twenty of these participants were identified as receiving special education services while 34 did not. Results indicated that adolescent perceptions of Academic Self-efficacy significantly predicted protective factors associated with resilience while Special Education Identification Status and Maternal Parental Involvement did not add significantly to the prediction. In addition, the moderating effects of sex and race did not add to the regression model, indicating that these constructs had little predictive effect on any of the predictor variables. Implications for enhancing the efficacy of school-based social emotional programming and services for at-risk adolescent youth are discussed in light of these results. Specifically, improving skills related to academic self-efficacy may be more beneficial for fostering protective factors associated with resilience in an adolescent age group.

Provenance

Received from ProQuest

Rights holder

Bethdalie Cruz

File size

132 p.

File format

application/pdf

Language

en

Discipline

Educational psychology

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